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Volunteers support students' return to the classroom

Posted on: March 30th 2021

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 28 volunteers, 15 days, 1 challenge.

And the challenge?  To support Amery Hill’s students return to classroom-based learning by undertaking the mass asymptomatic testing programme stipulated by the Government.   The phased return of students commenced on March 8th with testing moving at pace to enable all students to return on Wednesday 10th March. Logistically it was a mammoth challenge and one that the school would not have been able to achieve without the help of a willing band of incredible volunteers. Students also played their part and embraced the testing regime with maturity, with some conquering anxieties under the nurturing and reassuring guidance of volunteers and staff.

Talking about the community involvement in the programme, Mr Stephen Mann, Headteacher, said, “The school has been overwhelmed by the offers of support from parents and grandparents of students at the school, from our neighbours, members of the local community and from governors and support staff. All of our volunteers have invested a huge amount of time for the benefit of our community and undergone training to develop skills and knowledge to carry out the testing safely and efficiently. They have registered students for their tests, supervised and guided the students as they self-swab and processed tests and recorded results. They have generously given their time and always with a reassuring smile.”

Almost 3,000 tests have been carried out over 15 days, enabling Amery Hill’s students to safely return to the classroom and re-engage with face-to-face learning.  Mr Mann added “It has been a real pleasure to welcome our students back to school and to see them reconnecting with friends and eager to learn. We are incredibly fortunate to have such a wonderful, supportive community and on behalf of Amery Hill School, I thank our volunteers for helping to keep everyone in our school community safe.”

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Rights Respecting School Award
Posted on: 9/04/2022

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