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Amery Hill School Prom - A night to remember

Posted on: June 28th 2017

Green Year Group Photo newsheader

Amery Hill’s Year 11 students celebrated the end of their secondary school education with a sophisticated dinner and dance at Froyle Park, Upper Froyle. The event arrangements were led by the Student Prom Committee with the evening themed ‘A night to remember’. Talking about the event, Progress Leader, Mrs Esther Keen, commented “The students organised the event like a team of professionals! Their carefully made plans ensured the evening was perfect in every way and it is definitely one they will remember.” The evening opened with an impressive array of transport for the traditional arrival at Amery Hill School, including a horse-drawn carriage, vintage vehicles, including a RAF fire and rescue truck and a variety of sports cars.

The students looked stunning and everything was perfectly in place from the suits and the bow ties, the beautifully elegant dresses to the handbags, the heels and the tiaras! Tutors and students enjoyed a reception in the wonderful surroundings of Froyle Park before sitting down to a delicious dinner followed by the presentation of awards and speeches. The evening was rounded off by plenty of photo opportunities and dancing. What a night to remember!

To view all photographs taken at the Green Year Prom click here

Note to Green Year Students if you would like a copy of your photos please contact Mrs Rose in the IT Department.

Gallery

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Remembrance Day
Posted on: 10/11/2017

Remembrance Day

For many years, students from Amery Hill School have assisted local historian Tony Cross remember the casualties of the two world wars who are buried in Alton Cemetery. This year, volunteers from Year 9 cleaned the distinctive Commonwealth War Grave Commission headstones and placed a Cross of Remembrance on each grave in advance of Armistice Day. In doing so, they learned something of the simple design of the headstones and the circumstances associated with the reasons why the men were buried in Alton, rather than on traditional battlefields. The presence of a WWI memorial plaque on a traditional headstone, gave students an insight into the grieving of local families who had no burial place for their loved ones. Other inscriptions on family headstones tell of a young man who perished with the loss of HMS Hampshire in 1916; another who died as a prisoner of war whilst in captivity in Turkey following the surrender of Kut the same year; and a young man who died on D-Day, 6 June 1944. All of these inscriptions brought home the scattered nature of the losses suffered by Alton’s families in the time of war. Passers-by who were interested in what the students were doing seemed impressed by their selfless actions: a notable feature of our community-spirited students. Wearing a Poppy is the traditional sign of remembering those who died in the service of our country; giving one’s time to ensure the memory of those who were lost in past conflicts is maintained, is something more pro-active.View Article