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Amery Hill Remembers

Posted on: November 9th 2018

Newsheaderww1Amery Hill marks the Centenary of the First World War Armistice
Students and staff at Amery Hill School have been involved in a number of different projects to mark the Centenary of the First World War Armistice. It is customary for the school to mark the Armistice but this year has seen a huge creative effort involving the whole school community, with the artwork produced now on display at Winchester Cathedral, the Winchester Discovery Centre, Gosport Museum and The Iron Age Museum in Andover. However, possibly the greatest honour for the school is to be involved in ‘The Nation’s Thank you – the People’s Procession’ which will see students place wreaths at The Cenotaph on Whitehall in London, on Remembrance Sunday.

Hope, Peace, Remembrance
The Art Department has led Amery Hill's contribution towards the county-wide Art project, ‘Hope Peace and Remembrance’ which was recently installed in Winchester Cathedral as well as a magnificent display at Amery Hill.

The installation in the Cathedral included artwork produced by students from both primary and secondary schools across Hampshire. During lunch times, a number of students volunteered to produce ceramic doves which were decorated and glazed with the words - Hope, Peace and Remembrance. These were arranged on canes at the top of the hanging displays. 

The school installation was inspired by the artist Jennifer Collier who works using collage and in particular empty teabags. Over a six month period, both students and staff have produced a teabag containing images or words they associate with World War 1. Many even decided to link it to their own personal family histories which opened up discussions with families at home, discovering how previous generations were involved in the war. These have been added to collaged poppies and doves, all of which were made using WW1 poetry. The display is truly amazing and a poignant reminder of the events which occurred 100 years ago.  

The creativity of students has not stopped there though, with Year 7 and 8 students being involved in designing and creating wreaths.

The Unremembered
Year 8 students participated in a project organised by Big Ideas, entitled ‘The Unremembered’. This community engagement project was a national campaign which aimed to raise awareness of the contribution of the Labour Corps in WW1. Two students from each tutor group were selected to be wreath representatives. They chose a theme and created a design for their wreath, merging their creativity and knowledge of history to commemorate the dedication of WW1 soldiers and their families from across the Commonwealth. The students have worked well together, coming up with some amazingly creative ideas and designs; the wreaths all look wonderful. The wreaths will be taken up to London and will be placed at The Cenotaph on Whitehall as part of ‘The Nation’s Thank You - the People’s Procession’ on Remembrance Sunday.

Year 7 Design and Technology students designed and made a wreath for display in the school reception to commemorate Remembrance Day on 11th November. 

Students found images and words to represent, remember and give thanks to those who served in the First World War and to those who never returned home. They used Computer Aided Design to engrave these onto a plywood base and poppies were laser cut from acrylic plastic, heated and shaped to create the unique wreath.

 

Gallery

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